What To Do If You Are Denied Overtime Wage By Your Employer?

When an employee is required to work overtime, they expect their employer to pay them for the hours they rendered in excess of their regular working hours. The Fair Labor Standards Act stipulates that employers are required to pay overtime wage to employees who work in excess of 40 hours per week. The general rule is that employees should be paid 1.5 times their regular rate of pay. However, this varies from one state to another.

The bad news is that many companies are not paying overtime wage to their employees. Overtime pay lawyers of Williams Kherkher will tell you that most businesses will even devise some scheme so that they will not pay overtime wage. If you have been denied overtime pay, there are several steps you can take to recover your overtime pay:

1. Jot it down

Make sure to have all your overtime hours written in black and white. Take note of all the times and dates and not just the hours you rendered. Avoid keeping it in your computer or work drawer because someone can easily discard it and you have no evidence against your employer.

2. File A Report With The Department of Labor

Fill up the IRS Form SS-8 for any complaints against your employer regarding overtime pay. If the IRS deems that you have been misclassified or your employer violated the law on overtime pay. You can then lodge your complaint to the Department of Labor.

3. Get an attorney

With the help of an attorney, you may be able to recover the overtime pay that your employer denied to you. Not only that, you may also be able to help out your co-workers who were likewise denied of their overtime pay.

The Fair Labor Standards Act protects employees from being denied their overtime pay for the excess hours they rendered. Know your right as an employee and get paid for what you truly deserve.

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